The Latest Addition to the Travel Market

Islamic holidays and Halal friendly holidays are some phrases that we hear more and more these days in the world of travel. What does it truly mean? More than just finding halal food, it is a mode of holiday that caters to a type of lifestyle. Travel is something that almost all people love doing as it provides a break from the routine of daily life. Thus, it is no wonder that the travel industry as a whole works towards catering to different needs. We are regularly made aware of the different types of holidays on offer such as luxury holidays, luxury cruises, eco holidays, weekend getaways, budget holidays, backpacking and camping holidays. The list is literally endless as new and more innovative holiday ideas are brought to the market.

Global trends and needs are constantly changing and one such new trend is the development of the type of vacations that are known as Halal holidays. These holidays have taken into consideration all aspects of Muslim lifestyles and each detail is planned; from the destinations, to accommodation, to food and other such requirements so that the holiday goer can truly enjoy a relaxing vacation. Muslim holiday makers are fast becoming a big market in the travel trade and catering to their holiday requirements is proving lucrative, though still relatively in the early stages. This is why more holiday destinations and accommodation providers are developing the foundation needed to cater to this market.

In simple terms, Islamic Holidays take the requirements of an Islamic lifestyle into consideration by providing certain facilities that help facilitate and ensure that the customs are respected. Separate areas for males and females are provided along with separate swimming pools, secluded beach areas for the different genders and even separate spa facilities. There are even separate male and female attendants to look into the needs of guests. This allows Muslim women to enjoy their holiday with the family as they too can enjoy a swim in a pool away from male guests. Further, guests can be one hundred percent sure of the food that they eat and that it meets with their religious requirements. Accommodation providers catering to Halal travel do not serve alcohol, while also providing important information such as prayer times and direction and even in some cases prayer mats.

Alki Point: Kerosene Lantern to Lighthouse

In 1868 Hans Martin Hanson and his brother-in-law Knud Olson purchased the 260 acres of land from Dr. David Maynard. The purchase price was $450. Later Hanson and Olson divided the property with Hanson’s portion being the point.

Legend has it that sometime during the 1870s farmer Hanson hung a brass kerosene lantern from a post. He did this in order to mark the dangerous shoals of Alki Point for the mariners of Puget Sound who were increasing in numbers.

In 1887 the Federal Lighthouse Board decided that Alki Point was extremely hazardous to marine traffic and they replaced Hanson’s kerosene lantern with a “post lantern”. “Post lanterns” were used at many locations until a lighthouse could b e built.

Because the lantern was on his property, Hanson was appointed light keeper. His salary was $15.00 a month. For this he filled the fuel tank, cleaned the glass, trimmed the wicks and lit and extinguished the lamp daily. He was helped by his son, Edmund, his six daughters, and his niece Linda Olson.

Mr. Martin’s children inherited his 320-acre farm when he died on July 26, 1900. They also inherited the light keeper’s job which still paid only $15. a month. Edmund and his cousin Linda Olson along with Edmund’s children kept the lamp burning for another 10 years.

In 1910 the U. S. Lighthouse Service purchased the 1.5 acre pie-shaped piece of land at Alki Point for $9,999. A 37-foot-tall octagonal concrete and masonry tower with an attached fog signal building was built on the point. Behind the lighthouse was build two large homes for the lighthouse keepers and their families. In order to protect the buildings from heavy swell during storms and high tides the contractors brought in about 7,000 yards of sand and gravel an d added to the point.

This required the service of two lighthouse keepers doing 12-hour shifts seven days a week for which they were each paid $800 a year plus housing.

Over the years various improvements were made in the lighthouse system and changes in personnel were made until in 1970, Albert G Anderson, the last civilian lighthouse keeper retired after spending 20 years at Alki Point.

All of the light keeping was done manually at the point until the 1980′s. Coast Guardsmen stood guard on eight-hour watches, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The keeper turned the airway beacon on one-half hour before sunset and turned it off one-half hour after sunrise. The Chief Lighthouse Keeper’s house was occupied by the Commander of the 13th Coast Guard District.

The Alki Point Lighthouse was fully automated in October 1984. The modern VRB-25 marine rotating beacon operates 24 hours a day, flashing once every five seconds.. An emergency light located on the outside of the tower is operated by 12 volt batteries. Two electric fog horns are activated when visibility drops below three miles.

The Coast Guard Museum, Pier 36, 1519 Alaskan Way S in Seattle is where you can see, on display, the old post lantern that was placed on Alki Point in 1887 by the Lighthouse Service.

5 Cool Things To Do At A Ski Lodge During Late Spring and Summer

When you hear the words ‘ski lodge’, you’re immediately swept away by images of fresh fallen snow, bright ski gear, snowboarding, and chair lifts. Well, while all of those images are well and good, what happens during the late spring and summer months? After all, the amount of snow falling will be drastically lower & what is on the ground may not be the most conducive to traditional “slope” activities.

The important thing is to not get discouraged. Traveling to a ski lodge during less-than-peak times doesn’t mean you’re out of luck in terms of the fun. In fact, you might be in store for some absolutely awesome times. Here are five things that will make your post-ski season ski lodge visit an absolute blast:

1. Hiking – This is an unsung activity that often gets touted as a “must do” in just about any environment. Keep in mind, though, that you’re in the mountains, and as such, the terrain is actually the birthplace of the hike. You’re also being greeted by an environment that has cool, temperate weather, elevations that test your physical fitness, and you can finally eat trail mix on a trail where you’re using a lot of energy!

2. Camping – Ski lodges have the fortunate nature of being in and around national forests. Not only are you greeted with pristine, unspoiled nature, you’re also given the chance to really enjoy the wild. Take advantage by taking a walk along a riverbank or just look up in the sky & see all of the stars that you aren’t afforded by living in the big city.

3. Fishing – It might be a hard sell to call fishing a ‘cool’ activity, but the fact remains that anglers and outdoorsman are part of the original “mountain folk” in this country, so in some respects, by casting a line into a mountain stream, you are connecting with a long line of pioneers. Plus, being able to fish is about as relaxed as you can get. The key is to remember that the fishing is the fun part, and you always have the catching to look forward to as well.

4. Horseback Riding – Luckily, many ski lodges and their surrounding towns offer horseback riding to visitors as a way to explore. Riding a horse is akin to connecting to a traditional way of life, and it’s also a great way for someone to gain an appreciation for the amazing animal we call the horse.

5. Off-Road Adventure – Now for something completely different! Many ski lodges are situated near off-road vehicle trails. What better way to hit the “back country” than by revving your ATV engine and letting nature know you’re there to explore. Many lodges can steer you in the right direction for ATV rental companies so you don’t have to supply your own vehicle.